Kim

Author's details

Name: Kim
Date registered: March 3, 2012
URL: http://sandpipersthoughts.blogspot.com/

Latest posts

  1. Sandpiper's Thoughts: The De-Churched — December 19, 2014
  2. connexions: Mary’s manifesto — a hymn — December 19, 2014
  3. Sandpiper's Thoughts: Into the Story — December 18, 2014
  4. connexions: Rejoicing with Druids: Revd. John Ames on Christmas — December 18, 2014
  5. Sandpiper's Thoughts: Not in a Vacuum — December 17, 2014

Most commented posts

  1. Sandpiper's Thoughts: Interrupting — 1 comment
  2. Sandpiper's Thoughts: Forming a Line — 1 comment
  3. connexions: Simone Weil, b. 3 February 1909: 6 pensées — 1 comment
  4. connexions: Ten clichés Christians should never use — 1 comment
  5. Sandpiper's Thoughts: Park Benches — 1 comment

Author's posts listings

Dec 19 2014

Sandpiper's Thoughts: The De-Churched

Original post at http://sandpipersthoughts.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-de-churched.html


In a sermon last Sunday, Alan asked, "How have we blocked Christ from those who might be called the "de-churched?"

First of all, I've never heard of the term de-churched, but as he said it, I knew who he was talking about.  This isn't the unchurched.  This is not those who have never made church a part of their lives. This is those who used to attend; who maybe came regularly, or semi-regularly, and now just are a part at all, or very peripherally.  These are the people who know and now miss.  What happened?

He asks, "How have we blocked Christ from these people?"

It's an important question.  Have we been less than inclusive?  Less than hospitable?  Have we been judgmental or hypocritical?  Has worship been less than engaging?  Have we failed to be supportive? Have we kept Christ to ourselves and not shared?  What other ways have we blocked Christ's love and light?

It might not be a question to ask ourselves or fellow members of our churches.  I'm not sure we know the answer.  The people to ask are those who are no longer with us - those that we miss.  How can we do that?

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/12/the-de-churched/

Dec 19 2014

connexions: Mary’s manifesto — a hymn

Original post at http://theconnexion.net/wp/?p=14370


In Mary’s song of praise and peace we call “Magnificat”, a peasant maiden mocked the claims of earth’s proud plutocrats. An angel whispered, “You’re the one who’ll carry heaven’s child.” The girl, in fearful faith, said, “Yes!” but barely forced a smile. She went to see a kindred soul, who praised what God would do; yet Mary felt a deep unease about the coming coup. But then [...]

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/12/marys-manifesto-a-hymn/

Dec 18 2014

Sandpiper's Thoughts: Into the Story

Original post at http://sandpipersthoughts.blogspot.com/2014/12/into-story.html


One of my best experiences of Bible Study has been my participation in a Disciple class.  I loved the in depth study of scripture and the commitment to read and work together to learn the message in the words.  Great experience.

One of the "take aways" from that class has been that we learned several tools to use to explore the depth of the Word.  One of them was to ask the question, "Which character in the story are you?"  In other words, can you place yourself in the story?

I thought of that this morning as I read from Hamilton's Not a Silent Night.  The chapter I'm reading is based on the story of Jesus in the Temple.  His parents leave town, and he isn't with them. Hamilton tells of a time that he and his wife accidentally left their 6 year old in a Disney Store at Disney World as they headed into the park.  The story ended well (thank goodness), but it gives him a special affinity to the story of Mary and Joseph rushing back to find Jesus.

How can you allow your experiences to pull you deeper into the story?  I wrote a day or two ago about the biases we bring to scripture.  It's true, so let's use them to move closer to God, all the time aware of what we are doing.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/12/into-the-story/

Dec 18 2014

connexions: Rejoicing with Druids: Revd. John Ames on Christmas

Original post at http://theconnexion.net/wp/?p=14360


Two things I find obnoxious about certain Christians at Christmas: not only, obviously, (1) the idiotic belligerence of some over the so-called “War on Christmas” (”Go ahead, punk, make my day: wish me ‘Happy Holidays’!”); but also, tiresomely, (2) the predictable sanctimonious pontifications and self-flagellations of others about in-house excess (”My fellow believers, remember the [...]

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/12/rejoicing-with-druids-revd-john-ames-on-christmas/

Dec 17 2014

Sandpiper's Thoughts: Not in a Vacuum

Original post at http://sandpipersthoughts.blogspot.com/2014/12/not-in-vacuum.html


On Sunday evening, we talked about the idea that everyone interprets the Bible.  No one is able to just read it.  We all place our own biases on it when we read; it's impossible not to do that.  Knowing we do that is important, however.  If we are aware that our reading of the Bible is done through our selves - our biases and beliefs, our experiences and opinions - then we can watch for them.

Knowing that makes us more willing to listen to other people's thoughts concerning the scripture. How are they different from our own?  Could that difference somehow be related to our biases? What does the difference say to us?  To them?

In the same way, we interpret the world around us through our own biases.  Haven't you ever seen or heard a comment someone has made, and been certain you know what that person is talking about, only to find out that you were completely wrong?  Haven't you seen someone else do this?  I have. We need to be aware that our conclusions are not always - if ever - based in just fact.  Our thoughts and feelings are never formed in a vacuum.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/12/not-in-a-vacuum/

Dec 16 2014

Sandpiper's Thoughts: Outside and Inside

Original post at http://sandpipersthoughts.blogspot.com/2014/12/outside-and-inside.html


Adam Hamilton, in his book Not a Silent Night, quotes Alexander Solzhenistsyn:
If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them.  But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being.  And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?
This is an interesting thought.  How much easier it would be if there were "good guys" and "bad guys."  You and I both know that is not the case.  Why do I sometimes act as if it is?  And I'm not the only one.

Do you read Facebook?  Do you see the posts people create that judge other people?  I have a friend who says he is judgmental of people who are judgmental.  Perhaps I'm doing that, but I see people blame Republicans, Democrats, Obama, Bush, Muslims, Christians, young people, old people - you name the group, and we will blame them for something.

We even blame God, with remarks like, "God needed another angel, so your child died."   Or "I know the cancer is bad, but it's all part of God's plan."

This is a rambling post, but my point is that sin is around us, but we sometimes downplay the idea that sin is inside us.  Maybe that realization would make us less judgmental?

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/12/outside-and-inside/

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