John

Author's details

Name: John
Date registered: March 3, 2012
URL: http://lomperianreview.blogspot.com/

Latest posts

  1. Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: juggling act — October 27, 2014
  2. Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: In the on-deck circle — October 26, 2014
  3. Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: the disappearing child — October 20, 2014
  4. Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: It’s all been done — October 10, 2014
  5. Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: ‘I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore’ — October 7, 2014

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Author's posts listings

Oct 27 2014

Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: juggling act

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/LakeNeuron/~3/jF7ZT4tqCdc/


I had three different groups today during my Raise Your Hand Tennessee volunteer time at Learning Way.

Ms. Aymett had given me a basket of several different activities – but several of the little Ziploc bags, which she had described to me as containing rhyming words, did not rhyme. I looked at the pictures, and I looked at the teacher’s list of words, and there was not one rhyming combination in the first bag, and I don’t think there was one in the second bag either. (I think she just grabbed the wrong bags.)

So we moved on to one of the other games, where the kids are given are some words and asked to put them together into a sentence. The kids were surprisingly eager to do this.

The group dynamics of this were interesting, and I had to watch to make sure I was managing them as well as I could. In one particular group, there was a boy who was very pro-active (and right, a good part of the time). I wanted to reward him for being right, but I didn’t want him to take over the process or take too much time away from others.

I was well aware that other students (like the very quiet girl sitting right next to me) might or might not have the right answer, and that might be unrelated to whether or not they were willing to jump in. I had to be very deliberate – and I’m not sure I was successful – about trying to manage things so that everyone had a hand in the process.

I love this experience – but by the end of the hour, I’ve usually been keenly reminded what an amateur I am.

My third group was just two children, both girls, and with that one it was a lot easier. We breezed through the sentence game, and had time for the only other thing in the basket: some flash cards with words and letters on them. I thought this would be a hard sell, but they were happy to demonstrate their expertise.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/10/juggling-act-2/

Oct 26 2014

Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: In the on-deck circle

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/LakeNeuron/~3/Lm0S5_IMH0s/


At this time next weekend, I’ll be noveling.

It’s been two or three years since I’ve made a serious stab at National Novel Writing Month, but – along with several of my recent “Daddy’s Dyin’” castmates – I’m going to do so this year.

National Novel Writing Month – “NaNoWriMo,” to participants – is an annual writing exercise, just for the fun of it. It’s not competitive (unless you make it so!), and anyone can participate, whether you normally consider yourself a writer or not. The idea is that you write a 50,000-word novel (which some would call a novella) entirely during the month of November. You can prepare in advance (plot outline, character biographies, etc.), but the normal interpretation is that you do not start any actual writing until Nov. 1.

If you get to 50,000 words by November 30, even if you haven’t finished the novel, you have “won” – although bragging rights and personal satisfaction are the only stakes.

The idea here is that 1,667 words per day is a very fast pace. It’s too fast for you to stop and do any editing, and it’s too fast for any long pondering about what to add. You have to make yourself sit down and write, period.

Some of what you write in that fast a pace is, almost by necessity, going to be horrible. The novel as a whole may turn out not to be anything at all good or marketable (which are not the same thing). But by forcing yourself to write every day, and hopefully turning off that little “no” voice in your head, you sometimes come up with little creative ideas and twists and turns that would never happen in a careful, more deliberate environment.

The official NaNoWriMo web site offers you a chance to connect with other participants, gives pep talks, and allows you an easy way of tracking your word count. You enter your word count and the site and you can see an easy-to-understand line graph showing whether you’re ahead of or behind pace. If you’ve missed a day (I doubt I’ll get much writing done on Election Day, for example), the site will show you what your pace needs to be to catch up and still get to 50,000 by month’s end.

In some areas, there are actually author meet-ups or “write-ins” at some quiet place like a library or coffee shop, where you can bring your laptop and do what’s normally a very solitary activity in the company of others. (“Anybody got a suggestion for a character name?”) I don’t have a laptop, and the closest location for the meetups is in Murfreesboro, but I’d love to go to one some day just to see what it’s like.

If you make it, there’s usually a little certificate you can download and print out, plus a little logo you can post to your web site or social media. It’s all on the honor system, though. Sometimes the Amazon-owned self-publisher Createspace offers you a free proof copy of your novel, which is how I came to publish my own Bad Self-Published Novel, which began its life as a NaNoWriMo project.

You can always go back later, after November has ended and you’ve taken a bit of a break, and see whether or not you think there’s enough there to make it worth trying to rewrite the novel, taking out the terrible stuff while leaving in those moments of inspiration.

There have actually been authors who have traditionally published novels which began during NaNoWriMo. Many others, of course, have self-published their NaNoWriMo novels. I still wonder what would have happened to “Soapstone” if I’d been a little bit more patient and gotten it professionally edited.

Anyone can participate in NaNoWriMo. It’s completely free, although they do sell merchandise and solicit donations to keep the web site up and running. The sense of accomplishment you feel when you get to 50,000 is amazing.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/10/in-the-on-deck-circle/

Oct 20 2014

Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: the disappearing child

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/LakeNeuron/~3/sh45IZZkI_8/


I have been in kind of a funk the past few days, but I knew my weekly volunteer hour at Learning Way Elementary would get my mind off things.

This week, Regan had me with the same group of kids – three of them – for the whole hour. We played two different games and I read two different booklets to them.

It all started off well enough – they did well with the first game. But as the hour went on, one boy became a little more animated. He tried to read aloud from his book even while I was trying to read to the group (and he was on a different page). A different boy became a little more withdrawn as the hour went on. Regan had apparently made him take off his hoodie earlier, and I, not knowing this, let him put it back on. (He said he was cold.) As the hour went on he kind of disappeared into it, pulling the hood down over his head and the torso up over his chin.

The two booklets were fairly standard little things, and very similar to each other – one was about how plums are grown, the other was about the life cycle of acorns becoming oak trees and then dropping new acorns. Regan had specifically told me to read each book twice aloud to the kids.

“This is stupid,” said one of the kids.

I tried to be patient and kind throughout but also to be firm and direct when I needed to keep things on track. I think by the end of the hour I was getting a little frustrated. (And I only do this for an hour a week.)

The third child, a girl, was fine. I had no problems with her whatsoever.

I so admire the professionals who do this day in and day out.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/10/the-disappearing-child/

Oct 10 2014

Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: It’s all been done

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/LakeNeuron/~3/yDY7BpuK7-A/


I have not gotten the chance to watch the new TV series “Gotham,” although some of my friends have praised it on Facebook.

The show is set in Gotham City, but without Batman – it’s set at about the time that young Bruce Wayne’s parents are gunned down. It follows young police officer James Gordon as he tries to keep his integrity while rising through the city’s corrupt police force, as well as showing or hinting at the origins for various other Batman villains.

The pilot was supposed to have been spectacular, although some critics haven’t been as impressed with the subsequent episodes.

I probably ought to check the show out, but I’m suspicious of the premise. To me, prequels like this end up  being kind of forced, especially when you know for certain where the characters are eventually going to end up. I was never a regular viewer of “Smallville,” but I had to laugh at the episode descriptions – apparently, every major figure in the DC universe eventually had a flat tire while driving through the same little town in Kansas. What are the odds?

One thing almost no one has mentioned, and it surprises me, is that “Gotham” is not the first attempt at a Batman-free TV series set in Gotham City. That would be “Birds of Prey,” from 2002. I did see a few episodes of that (although it didn’t last very long).

“Birds of Prey,” based on a pre-existing DC comic book, takes place in a post-Batman Gotham City. Batman has had a final confrontation with the Joker, and it resulted in Selina Kyle (Catwoman) being killed by one of the Joker’s henchmen. Bruce Wayne, consumed by guilt and grief, disappears, and apparently the people of Gotham are too slow to notice that both Bruce and Batman disappeared from public view at about the same time.

“Birds of Prey” is about three women who try to protect the city in Batman’s absence, assisted by the always-loyal Alfred Pennyworth. Barbara Gordon, commissioner Gordon’s daughter, is vaguely known in popular culture for being Batgirl, as in the 1960s TV series. But in the comics at the time, she was a little older, confined to a wheelchair, and using the superhero name Oracle. (Batgirl returned to the print comics just recently, as part of a company-wide reboot of DC storylines.) Huntress (Helena Kyle) is Catwoman’s teenage daughter, and finds out in the first episode of the show that her father was the now-absent Batman. She has mysterious mutant-like tracking abilities. Dinah, the third member of the team, is psychic and telekinetic.

Helena Kyle, distraught over the death of her mother and the departure of the father she never knew, has begun seeing a psychiatriist, Dr. Harleen Quinzel. Quinzel is actually Harlequin, who was Joker’s right hand and now runs a crime empire of her own. (The character of Harlequin as the Joker’s assistant was actually created for “Batman: The Animated Series,” but was quickly picked up by the print comics.) At the beginning of the series, neither the patient nor the psychiatrist knows about the other’s secret identity. Mia Sara’s portrayal of Harlequin was easily the best thing about the few episodes of the show I happened to see.

“Birds of Prey” wasn’t a great show, but it had some interesting ideas. I just find it amusing that every review of “Gotham” gushes over the idea of Gotham City-without-Batman, not realizing that it’s been done before.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/10/its-all-been-done/

Oct 07 2014

Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: ‘I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take this anymore’

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/LakeNeuron/~3/xl1OzEIr-gI/


“Network” is on TCM right now.

I did not see, and would not have been old enough to appreciate, “Network” when it was still in the theaters. But I saw it on TV when it was still shocking. My younger friends have no way of appreciating this movie; if they watch it, it will come off completely different in their eyes.

When “Network” came out in 1976, there were three broadcast TV networks. Cable TV was a very minor business which primarily provided distant broadcast signals to rural areas too far away to receive them, as well as a few added bonuses like Ted Turner’s superstation (then still known as WTCG, later WTBS, now just TBS). Big cities didn’t even have cable TV.

The three broadcast networks were, make no doubt about it, profit-making businesses. But they at least wanted to maintain the illusion of public service, and the Federal Communications Commission required local TV stations to do that as well. The networks’ news operations weren’t necessarily loss leaders, but they were about prestige and respectability as well as profits.

So Paddy Chayefsky’s script in 1976 about a network dropping all pretense of public service, putting a ranting and raving lunatic on the air and surrounding him with astrologers and found-footage terrorists seemed like outlandish black comedy when it came out, and even a few years later when I first saw it. Paddy Chayefsky, a leading light of the “golden age” of live television in the 1950s, was accused of biting the hand that had fed him with this ridiculously over-the-top satire.

Now, of course, we have Kardashians and raving pundits (at both ends of the political spectrum). Howard Beale seems pretty tame compared to the reality of television, and popular culture, in 2014.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/10/im-as-mad-as-hell-and-im-not-going-to-take-this-anymore/

Oct 06 2014

Lake Neuron » Lake Neuron: John goes back to school

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/LakeNeuron/~3/Y013V2VaNw4/


Since January of 2013, I’ve been a volunteer with the “Raise Your Hand Tennessee” program at Learning Way Elementary School, spending an hour a week on Monday mornings as a volunteer.
In that spring semester of 2013, I divided my hour between Regan Aymett and another teacher, but in the 2013-14 school year, and again this year, I’m with Regan’s class for the whole hour. It’s always one of the highlights of my week.
The program is designed to help reading skills. You can volunteer to work individually with a child, or with groups. I volunteered to work with groups. United Way will work around your schedule to put you in a school near you on a day and time that’s convenient for you. (The program also does a background check on each volunteer, so parents and educators can feel safe about them coming into the classroom.)
Back when I signed up for the program, I think I had something in mind similar to when I’d visit a local school on “Read Across America” day — sitting in a rocking chair reading to the kids. But that hasn’t been it at all. Usually, what happens is that when I arrive, Regan will pull out a small group of kids and I’ll sit with them at a table, playing some sort of word-based game, or helping them fill out a worksheet based on some little story book.
I really enjoy it, and miss it during breaks.
The program is organized by local United Way groups, and each fall my friend, United Way of Bedford County executive director Dawn Holley, waits until after the horse show break to start calling school principals and setting things up for the new school year. Last week, Dawn gave me the go-ahead to start my volunteering for the school year, and so I was in Regan’s class this morning.
Regan is a “looping” first and second grade teacher, meaning that she teaches a group of first graders, then stays with them the next year as their second grade teacher, then loops back to pick up a new crop of first graders. So I’d been with many of the same kids during that first school-year-and-a-half, but now she’s got a brand new class.
Today, I worked with getting the kids to sort cards into proper nouns and common nouns. I had one group for the first half hour, then a different group for the second half hour. It all seems pretty basic, but Regan — an NEA Master Teacher, who’s had some of her lessons captured on video to be used by other teachers around the country — said to me at the end of the hour today that she can accomplish a lot more just by having me take one small group and her take another. (A third group of kids was over near the computer stations with a teaching assistant.)
I make up for my missing hour by coming in to work a half hour earlier on Mondays and working an extra half hour at some other time during the week. I really find it personally rewarding, and I strongly recommend it. As I said, you can choose whether you want to work with an individual child or with groups, and they’ll work around your schedule. There’s tons of scientific evidence about the educational value of adults reading to children or listening to children read.
It’s not too late to sign up for the program. Here in Bedford County, you can call United Way at 931-684-6685. Elsewhere in Tennessee, check with your local United Way organization, or check with the school system to see what sorts of volunteer programs are available.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/10/john-goes-back-to-school/

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