Allan Bevere

Author's details

Name: Allan Bevere
Date registered: March 3, 2012
URL: http://www.allanbevere.com/

Latest posts

  1. Allan R. Bevere: Saturday at the Cinema: How to Save Yourself from Bad Meetings — November 22, 2014
  2. Allan R. Bevere: The Habits of Unhappy People — November 21, 2014
  3. Allan R. Bevere: The Biggest Mistake in Kingdom Talk — November 21, 2014
  4. Allan R. Bevere: Caption Contest — November 21, 2014
  5. Allan R. Bevere: The Morning Habits of Happy People — November 20, 2014

Most commented posts

  1. Allan R. Bevere: Online Communion and Disembodied Gnosticism — 3 comments
  2. Allan R. Bevere: Yes, It Is Unavoidable… in the Head and in the Cafe — 2 comments
  3. Allan R. Bevere: You Don’t Get Strung Up on a Cross for Running Around Telling Everyone to Love One Other — 1 comment
  4. Allan R. Bevere: Francis Asbury– Bishop Self- Designate — 1 comment
  5. Allan R. Bevere: Drive-By Shootings, Twitter Style — 1 comment

Author's posts listings

Nov 22 2014

Allan R. Bevere: Saturday at the Cinema: How to Save Yourself from Bad Meetings

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allanbevere/ROss/~3/jIcXTwzM--k/saturday-at-cinema-how-to-save-yourself.html


Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/saturday-at-the-cinema-how-to-save-yourself-from-bad-meetings/

Nov 21 2014

Allan R. Bevere: The Habits of Unhappy People

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allanbevere/ROss/~3/3iD3GcA8nes/the-habits-of-unhappy-people.html


Yesterday I posted on the morning habits of happy people. The Huffington Post has published on the seven habits of unhappy people.
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Here are the 7 qualities of chronically unhappy people.

1. Your default belief is that life is hard.

2. You believe most people can't be trusted.


3. You concentrate on what's wrong in this world versus what's right.

4. You compare yourself to others and harbor jealousy.

5. You strive to control your life.

6 You consider your future with worry and fear.

7. You fill your conversations with gossip and complaints.
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The details of each can be read here.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/the-habits-of-unhappy-people/

Nov 21 2014

Allan R. Bevere: The Biggest Mistake in Kingdom Talk

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allanbevere/ROss/~3/9zNFTk3aKQE/the-biggest-mistake-in-kingdom-talk.html


Scot McKnight's book, Kingdom Conspiracy: Returning to the Radical Mission of the Local Church, is a much needed corrective to much current understanding of the kingdom of God as it relates (or for all too many, doesn't relate) to the church. In a post that he writes over at his blog, Jesus Creed, Scot speaks of what he calls "the biggest mistake in kingdom talk." He writes,

The most common mistake I hear when people are talking about kingdom is comparison talk. It goes like this or this or this or this:


"So you think kingdom and church are the same (but not identical), then you need to come to my church because that will show you the difference."

"Kingdom is the ideal, church is the reality."

"Kingdom is justice, but church is injustice."

"The church is but an approximation of the kingdom, a manifestation of the kingdom, but it is not the kingdom because the kingdom will be a utopian, perfect, just, reconciled, loving society."

"The church is now but the kingdom is not yet."

Scot observes that this kind of comparison language fails to understand how the New Testament speaks of kingdom. The mistake, as Scot rightly notes, is to compare the incomparable:

To compare present church to future kingdom is to compare the incomparable. (Kingdom wins.)

To compare the present kingdom with the future church is to compare the incomparable. (Church wins.)

To compare present church with present kingdom is to compare the comparable. (The same.)

To compare future church with future kingdom is to compare the comparable. (The same.)

At this point we need to make an observation: because so much of "church" thinking focuses on the Church Now without examining the Church Not Yet, any comparison of church with kingdom, which tends (as I have said already) to focus on the church now over against the Kingdom Not Yet, tends to conclude that they cannot be the same. Yet, if we compare Kingdom Now and Church Now we arrive at the same place, and as we are about to see, if we compare Kingdom Not Yet with Church Not Yet, we will discover once again a full overlap.

Kingdom describes the people governed by King Jesus. All we see of that kingdom now is an inauguration creating a tension between Kingdom Now and Kingdom Not Yet.

But church describes the very same realities: the People of God, Israel Expanded to be sure, is an eschatological reality, a People of God that has a Now and a Not Yet. C.K. Barrett, a leading New Testament scholar of the former generation, called the church an "eschatological monster, a prodigy." And he defines the church as "the people of the interim." He's right: the church is now and not yet, partially redeemed on its way to full redemption. So, what is said of the kingdom in the New Testament is said of the church in the same New Testament.

If we want to make comparison, we need to compare Kingdom Now and Church Now or Kingdom Not Yet and Church Not Yet. To compare, as so many do, Church Now with Kingdom Not Yet is not fair to the church (or the kingdom).

Let's not diss the church in the name of the kingdom. The church is the Body of Christ and Jesus is the king of the kingdom. You can't have one without the other.

Scot is spot on. His entire post is worth a read here.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/the-biggest-mistake-in-kingdom-talk/

Nov 21 2014

Allan R. Bevere: Caption Contest

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allanbevere/ROss/~3/U939y5vavTU/caption-contest.html


Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/caption-contest-29/

Nov 20 2014

Allan R. Bevere: The Morning Habits of Happy People

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allanbevere/ROss/~3/KUzWWF8WVYE/the-morning-habits-of-happy-people.html


from Naomi Teeter:
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Happy people tend to share many of the following morning habits:

1. They wake up with a sense of gratitude.

2. They begin anew each and every morning.


3. They take part in prayer, affirmation, or meditation.

4. They read.

5. They keep things simple and don't rush out the door.

6. They exercise.

7. They get some fresh air.

8. They savor the beauty of their surroundings and practice being present in the moment.
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The details of each can be found here.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/the-morning-habits-of-happy-people/

Nov 18 2014

Allan R. Bevere: Theology Needs the Church

Original post at http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/allanbevere/ROss/~3/NulvZdOA7Z8/theology-needs-church.html


from William Willimon:
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Do not attempt theology at home! Faithful Christian theology is a group activity. Our God is so wonderfully complex, dynamic, mysterious, and counter to who we expect God to be that you need help from your friends-- saints, past and present-- to think about the Trinity. As [John] Wesley said, Christianity is a "social religion"-- you can't do it alone.

The good news is that you don't have to come up with words about or words from God-- theology-- on your own. Wesleyan Christians are those who think about God along with the Wesleys and the church to which they gave birth. The theological revolution begun in eighteenth-century England has now spread to every corner of the globe.
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Source: "Think Like a Wesleyan," Circuit Rider, Nov/Dec/Jan, 2014-2015.

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/theology-needs-the-church/

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