Nov 28 2014

Kairos CoMotion Lectionary Dialogue: 1 Corinthians 1:3-9

Year B – Advent 1 or Needed Change 1
November 30, 2014
In the United States of America (again clarifying its dys-unity—racial at the moment and in other ways at various times) it is Thanksgiving Day (unified in its official celebration on the same 4th Thursday of November in 1941).
Rather than dreading the dysfunction of our common-good (for ever has it been thus) look to what is still available: we are not lacking in any spiritual gift. This means it is not too late to still take on the dys-unity round and about. We have what we need and this clarifies for us that the issue is that of desire, of will.
To date we have preferred to jockey for our privilege niche. Once we find it, it is like an enchanted evening, never to be let go. An Advent question is how much privilege we are willing to give up that others might have some and enough more to thrive. If we are all willing to die for our current state, we will collectively do ourselves in before Jesus is revealed in our care for one another.
Give thanks—there are enough gifts to make a change in our basic relationships with one another. May this become a radical understanding that we will act upon it now on behalf of subsequent generations for it will take all our current life-times to make this shift. Anything less than starting now to live out of our abundance of gifts just won’t do.
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If you are interested in following a daily devotional or to have past Year B comments in one collected spot, check out my new book Wrestling Year B: Connecting Sunday Readings with Lived Experience at http://amazon.com/author/wesleywhite

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/1-corinthians-13-9/

Nov 28 2014

One Mile Mosser: Thanksgiving and our Rituals

From time to time, people ask me why we should go to church. I would like to cite a specific example of how ritual functions—and worship is part of the Christian ritual.

A timely example of ritual is our secular celebration of Thanksgiving, which by the way, we model on the Hebrew notion of giving thanks to God. I suggest secular simply because Thanksgiving Day has been set aside for national thanksgiving to God by our presidents from at least as far back as Abraham Lincoln. In point of fact, for Christians every Sabbath Day is a day of thanksgiving. Thus, in a way, Christians should be experts at giving thanks to God.

Many families have their own thanksgiving rituals. I still remember the thanksgivings we spent at my grandmother’s house when growing up. We would all gather at the farm, eat a wonderful meal; dismiss the children to play outside. After the children left, the adults would push their plates back and listen to my grandfather spin tall tales about his life. Yet, his stories so entertained, that we youngsters would sneak back in and listen to his fantastic “whoppers!” Each Thanksgiving Day was exactly the same. Thanksgiving Days, as I remember them, are imprinted deeply on my soul. They were among my best childhood memories.

This is how ritual served us and my guess is that it functions this way for many families. We attend worship as either a nuclear family or part of the family of God because the ritual of worship gives our lives meaning and joy. Our worship ritual also gives us a formal opportunity to thank God for the gift we call life!

Come, Worship

Stay, Learn
Go, Serve

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/thanksgiving-and-our-rituals/

Nov 27 2014

Mercy Not Sacrifice: A Thanksgiving IHOP run and my complicity in the failure of capitalism

I don’t go shopping on Black Friday, not because I’m a virtuous person, but because it’s the one day when I get to wag my finger self-righteously at the concept of responsible consumerism, i.e. things like doing your homework, writing lists, making plans, comparing prices, and making responsible adult decisions, basically all the things I’ve [Read More…]

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/a-thanksgiving-ihop-run-and-my-complicity-in-the-failure-of-capitalism/

Nov 27 2014

Threads from Henry's Web: Rambling Through Ephesians

This past Sunday I was reading the Lectionary passages for Christ the King Sunday in which the epistle is Ephesians 1:15-23, in which Paul gives thanks for the Ephesian believers. I find the style of Ephesians quite fascinating, and especially these long prayer passages. In fact, I used two of them in a pamphlet I […]

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/rambling-through-ephesians/

Nov 27 2014

salvaged faith: Thankful #NaBloPoMo

Didn’t get too many pictures today, but full of thankfulness. For giggles and tickles… For a table full of pie… For the most amazing side dishes (including the brussel sprouts … Continue reading

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/thankful-nablopomo/

Nov 27 2014

David F. Watson: The Cynical Christian?

I once heard my seminary preaching professor, John Holbert, say, “There’s no such thing as a cynical Christian.” That claim has really stuck with me over the years because I do consider myself a Christian, and yet if I’m honest I know I can be pretty cynical, too. At one level, I believe that Holbert was right,…

Permanent link to this article: http://methoblog.com/3_0/2014/11/the-cynical-christian/

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